January 2017

Paula Moehlenkamp.JPG

Welcome Paula!

Paula Moehlenkamp is a new Biological Oceanography graduate student co-advised with Margaret McManus. She will be working with Aka Beebe to understand the changes associated with removing the Mangrove Island at Heʻeia Fishpond.

#IamSTEM blog on Colors of STEM website

Rosie was invited to share her science story on the Colors of Stem "I am STEM" blog. Although women make up 48% of the workforce, they hold only 23% of STEM positions.By telling our colorful and inspirational stories about our STEM journey to others, we can show what is possible!

Papaku Makawalu workshop in Hilo

We headed off to Hilo this month to participate in training to understand ancestral knowledge pertaining to the Hawaiian akua of Kane. It was an amazing experience that broadened our interpretations of the natural world.

November 2016

PNAS Feature on choanoflagellates

Our work was highlighted in the lasted PNAS feature on choanoflagellates! See form undergrad Leah Shiruzu collecting choanoflagellates.

Read more here: http://www.pnas.org/content/113/46/12889.full

 

November 21: Visit to Kamehameha School

The SOEST Maile Mentoring Bridge program visited Kamehameha Schools: Miss Bethany Kimokeo asked us to share with her Marine Science Classes our work within SOEST and potential programs that might benefit Kamehameha School students. 

L to R: Haunani Kane (Geology & Geophysics), Kristin McDonald (UH undergrad), Bethany Kimokeo (KS kumu), Rosie

L to R: Haunani Kane (Geology & Geophysics), Kristin McDonald (UH undergrad), Bethany Kimokeo (KS kumu), Rosie

November 12: Kilika spoke at the Bridging the Indigenous Knowledge of the Past with the Science of Today presentation with others in the Institute for Hawaiian Language Research and Translation. Read more here!

Members of the Institute of Hawaiian Language Research and Translation. From left: Paige Okamura, Kilika Bennett, Puakea Nogelmeier, ‘Anoi‘lani Aga, Kamealoha Forrest. Photo by Burt Lum

Members of the Institute of Hawaiian Language Research and Translation. From left: Paige Okamura, Kilika Bennett, Puakea Nogelmeier, ‘Anoi‘lani Aga, Kamealoha Forrest. Photo by Burt Lum

 

November 10-12: American Indian Science and Engineering Society National Conference featured the Alegado lab. 

September 2016

Sept 9-12: Rosie invited to speak at ASM Beneficial Microbes meeting (Seattle, WA) 

Highlights: 

  • 1st meeting with more than 1 choanoflagellate speaker
  • 1st meeting with more than 1 indigenous scientist presenting (actually most diverse meeting ever!)
  • got to meet Ed Yong featured choanoflagellates in his new book, "I Contain Multitudes"
 

Sept 7: Rosie moderated the Seas panel on "Conversations with Science, Tradition and the Sacred" @ UH Mānoa as part of the IUCN

May 2016

UH Mānoa is a microbiome powerhouse! With a shout out to our lab!

On May 13, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy announced a new National Microbiome Initiative (NMI), a coordinated effort to better understand microbiomes—communities of microorganisms that live on and in people, plants, soil, oceans and the atmosphere—and to develop tools to protect and restore healthy microbiome function. This initiative represents a combined federal agency investment of more than $121 million.

For years, the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa has been making substantial investments—through faculty hires, endowments and facilities—and plans to continue to build capacity in the emerging field of microbiome research.

“UH Mānoa is a powerhouse in the realm of microbiome research,” said UH Mānoa Vice Chancellor for Research Michael Bruno. “There are few, if any, universities with the number of world leaders in this domain—UH Mānoa has three members of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) who specialize in this field.”

UH projects and expertise

Numerous internationally recognized faculty at Mānoa actively contribute to this field of discovery. A sampling of some of these faculty and their research emphasis are listed below:

  • Rosie Alegado(C-MORE): Influence of bacteria on animal origins
  • Anthony Amend(Botany): Environmental and biogeographic processes that shape the composition of symbiotic microbial communities and how differences impact hosts
  • Gordon Bennett(Plant and Environmental Protection Sciences): Microbe-insect symbioses in native Hawaiian and pest insect systems
  • Edward DeLong(C-MORE): Develops and applies advanced genomic and robotic technologies to study dynamics of marine microbial communities from surface waters to the deep-sea
  • Ruth Gates(Hawaiʻi Institute of Marine Biology): Microbiomes of reef corals and their contribution to coral health and response to environmental stress
  • Michael Hadfield(PBRC): Mechanisms by which surface microbial films induce the settlement of invertebrate larvae and thus strongly influence sea floor ecosystems
  • Wei Jia(University of Hawaiʻi Cancer Center): Microbe-host interactions in the human gut microbiome that underlie the development of gastrointestinal cancer and metabolic disorders such as diabetes
  • Dave Karl (C-MORE): Microbial processes that determine how energy, nutrients and chemicals cycle through the open ocean
  • Margaret McFall-Ngai(PBRC): Uses simple invertebrate model systems to study how microbiomes colonize the surfaces of animal epithelia, the most common type of host-microbe interaction
  • Ned Ruby(PBRC): Mechanisms underlying microbe-microbe and microbe-host communication

Read full article here

CONGRATULATIONS TO OUR GRADUATES!

Aka Beebe & Ryan Ueunten graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Global Environmental Sciences this Spring. 

Aka Beebe & Ryan Ueunten graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Global Environmental Sciences this Spring. 

Heʻeia Science Night, May 19th, 6-8pm

RSVP to admin@paepaeoheeia.org

February 2016

Congratulations to Aka Beebe who was awarded the Hauʻoli Mau Loa Graduate Fellowship!

  • The Hauʻoli Mau Loa Fellowship provides full tuition and stipend for 2 years of graduate study as well as funds toward research or travel. 
  • Aka will be starting on his Masters in the Oceanography dept this Fall in our lab!

Hawaiian language resources on Microbial Oceanography

  • February is Hawaiian Language month (#kamhinaokaolelohawaii) in the state of Hawaiʻi and honors our stateʻs official language
  • C-MORE has created a short video on microbial oceanography in ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi.
  • Please check it out! 

 

January 2016

Our newest collaboration has been featured on the UH website!

A close-up image of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans with its feather-like tentacles extended from its tube. The tentacles both collect microscopic food particles from the water and serve as the place for gas exchange for the worm, passing carbon dioxide from the worm and gaining dissolved oxygen from the water. (credit: Brian Nedved)

A close-up image of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans with its feather-like tentacles extended from its tube. The tentacles both collect microscopic food particles from the water and serve as the place for gas exchange for the worm, passing carbon dioxide from the worm and gaining dissolved oxygen from the water. (credit: Brian Nedved)

 A grant, totaling more than $870,000, from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to the University of Hawaiʻi will support research to understand the mechanisms by which marine biofilm bacteria—bacteria that live in slime films on the surfaces of all objects submerged in the sea—induce the settling of larvae of marine invertebrate animals. With this grant, a UH research team will focus on a small tube worm, Hydroides elegans, that settles onto marine surfaces in warm ocean waters around the world where they form masses of hard, calcified tubes. The team, led by professor Michael Hadfield at the Kewalo Marine LaboratoryPacific Biosciences Research Center in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at UH Mānoa, includes larval biologist Brian Nedved (Kewalo Marine Laboratory), microbiologist Rosie Alegado (Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education) and natural products chemist Shugeng Cao (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, UHHilo).

http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2016/01/26/how-bacteria-induce-settling-and-transformation-of-marine-larvae-investigated/

June 2015

  • Congratulations to Aka for being accepted to the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation Program, which will provide funding to work on water quality of loʻi kalo. 
  • Welcome to our NSF Tribal REU Summer students Mikela Branco, Leah Shizuru and Kyle Yoshida!
  • We also welcome our C-MORE Summer Intern Hope Ushiroda-Garma, who will be a senior at Kamehameha Schools. 
L to R: Leah Shiruzu (KCC), Kyle Yoshida (Harvard CollegE), Hope Ushiroda-Garma (Kamehameha kapalama)

L to R: Leah Shiruzu (KCC), Kyle Yoshida (Harvard CollegE), Hope Ushiroda-Garma (Kamehameha kapalama)

  • Finally, a hui hou to C-MORE Scholar Akamu Jaber who is participating in the NSF Tribal REU at the University of Utah this summer. 

September 2014