January 2016

Our newest collaboration has been featured on the UH website!

A close-up image of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans with its feather-like tentacles extended from its tube. The tentacles both collect microscopic food particles from the water and serve as the place for gas exchange for the worm, passing carbon dioxide from the worm and gaining dissolved oxygen from the water. (credit: Brian Nedved)

A close-up image of the tubeworm Hydroides elegans with its feather-like tentacles extended from its tube. The tentacles both collect microscopic food particles from the water and serve as the place for gas exchange for the worm, passing carbon dioxide from the worm and gaining dissolved oxygen from the water. (credit: Brian Nedved)

 A grant, totaling more than $870,000, from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation to the University of Hawaiʻi will support research to understand the mechanisms by which marine biofilm bacteria—bacteria that live in slime films on the surfaces of all objects submerged in the sea—induce the settling of larvae of marine invertebrate animals. With this grant, a UH research team will focus on a small tube worm, Hydroides elegans, that settles onto marine surfaces in warm ocean waters around the world where they form masses of hard, calcified tubes. The team, led by professor Michael Hadfield at the Kewalo Marine LaboratoryPacific Biosciences Research Center in the School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology at UH Mānoa, includes larval biologist Brian Nedved (Kewalo Marine Laboratory), microbiologist Rosie Alegado (Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education) and natural products chemist Shugeng Cao (Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Daniel K. Inouye College of Pharmacy, UHHilo).

http://www.hawaii.edu/news/2016/01/26/how-bacteria-induce-settling-and-transformation-of-marine-larvae-investigated/